Heck Testifies Before House Panel on Three Kids Mine Cleanup Bill

Mar 22, 2013 Issues: Economy and Jobs

Washington, D.C. – As part of his continued efforts to pass federal lands legislation that will bring economic development to southern Nevada, Congressman Joe Heck (NV-03) testified before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 697, the Three Kids Mine Remediation and Reclamation Act. The bill, supported by the entire Nevada delegation, will help the Bureau of Land Management and the City of Henderson clean up a toxic abandoned mine site at no cost to taxpayers. Cleaning up the Three Kids Mine site will create new jobs in Henderson and will turn a community liability into an opportunity for economic development for southern Nevada.

“This is a unique and complex ‘public/private partnership’ proposal.  It will finally lead to the cleanup of the Three Kids Mine site at no cost to the Federal Government.”

“I believe that this initiative offers a viable solution for the cleanup and reclamation of the Three Kids Mine and could serve as a model for other similar sites across the country.”

Congressman Heck’s full testimony before the subcommittee is attached. To see a video of Rep. Heck’s remarks, click here.

Rep. Heck introduced H.R. 697 in February. The entire Nevada house delegation has co-sponsored the bill and Senators Harry Reid and Dean Heller have introduced the companion bill in the Senate. Additional information on the bill can be found here.

BACKGROUND:

•  The Three Kids Mine site is a 1,260 acre abandoned manganese mine and mill site located along the south side of Lake Mead Drive, across the highway from Lake Las Vegas, in Henderson.

•  The bill would direct the BLM to convey the federal portions of the Three Kids Mine site to the City of Henderson’s Redevelopment Agency for fair market value taking into account the cost of reclamation for the mine site.

•  Once it receives title to the land, the Redevelopment Agency will work with a developer to complete the cleanup to meet stringent state and federal standards and to develop a residential community in its place.

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